pagination., *:after { text-transform:lowercase; }

how i learned boldness as a way of being

| literature |

mom is this: loving, smart, funny, kind. aside from her career as a social worker in public schools, her days are spent in a novel, or filling the back yard with careful color, hours in the dirt inventing blooming worlds. i have no patience for dirt and hold an irrational fear of snails, which makes me admire my mother very much for her specific bravery. mom has a good sense of humor, we tease her and she is confident enough to laugh along with love. she has taught me self-worth. through our unwavering, unconditional love and trust i’ve learned what it means to be a good person, and a good partner, and that courage is far more than a mixtape of angry folk music. that the choice to shave my ‘pits doesn’t make me less feminist, but perhaps adds to my texture, allows me to contain multitudes and contradictions, just as men have gotten to for centuries without question. perhaps most importantly, mom taught me that boldness does not come in one flavor, is not relegated to just women with nose rings and afros, doc martens and mohawks. boldness is a way of being.

it is these lessons i carry with me, knowing that underneath the packaging is a landmine of possibility in every woman walking this earth. it has become my mission to pull stories out of women, to unearth our shame about not being good enough, cool enough, bad ass enough, to bless the packaging we are born with and the presentation we choose. the magic recipe? a little pinch of my own experimental boundary crossing mixed with mom’s profound understanding and ability to see straight to the heart of a person. oh, and of course, an openness to know women are really wild and special creatures.

_______________________________________________________________

caits meissner is a poet and educator dedicated to transformation and healing through storytelling.she currently facilitates digging deep, facing self: a 30 day intensive online writing course designed to uplift, heal and transform women into their boldest selves. learn more at www.caitsmeissner.com/course

source:

+ © neonV volume III: bare MMXIV |neonVllc  

+ ©  personal essay courtesy of caitsmeissner

Itanekeya word

eic + creative director

how i learned boldness as a way of being

| literature |

mother earth’s sat at the corner of madison, an aptly named cafe where the misfits among us would go to feel sheltered from the world. as a teen i attended the cafe religiously to see paddy kilrain, a local spin off of our woman-goddess ani difranco. sloppy with the hand of urgency, my subsequent comics depicted all the ladies who loved ladies vying for paddy's charming folkie attention. on each panel, a gaggle of queer-coded women showing off their armpit hair to paddy, telling her about their latest poems, bragging about their potent feminism, a sheer exaggeration of this darling, out and proud community that found home in the cafe’s sunken, collaged walls. we were a scruffy bunch who found solace in the same songs and gravitated toward each other in desperation to belong, but the truth is, i was a lucky one.

in school i was revered for my pink hair and combat boots. the town was a mix of the trailer park kids who lived next door to the school, and the deeper suburbs boasted parents with coveted professional careers and suvs. i was smart, and flaunted my creativity in a way that magically positioned me as cool and wise, attractive to the underdogs and interesting enough to the popular students to pass through the hallways unscathed. being a girl into girls, a girl who dressed differently, who wrote songs for class projects and shared my views on feminism earned me enough clout to advise on truly adult women topics. i’d counsel classmates on their first gynecology appointments and what to expect when the speculum entered that dark cave of femininity, and that a yeast infection was not an indication of sexual contact and that you must go to a woman because, duh, she understands our bodies.

now, flash forward to 2014. after a few glasses of good wine, my mother relishes these tales of angsty caits, my hyper-real version of ‘90s feminism, recounting a story my husband already knows, but leans in to hear its re-telling. it’s a story that fills in the gaps between militant caits and just left of middle of the road caits. “we had just gotten used to having a lesbian daughter,” she says, “when caits proclaims she is now dating men. we were stunned! but we are ready for you, now!”

read part II of caits' personal essay tomorrow…

source:

+ © neonV volume III: bare MMXIV |neonVllc  

+ ©  personal essay courtesy of caitsmeissner

Itanekeya word

eic + creative director

culture |                                               

                                                  shaniqwa jarvis

source:

+ © neonV volume III: bare MMXIV |neonVllc  

+ © photos courtesy of shaniqwa jarvis

Itanekeya word

eic + creative director

culture |                                               

                                                  shaniqwa jarvis

source:

+ © neonV volume III: bare MMXIV |neonVllc  

+ © photos courtesy of shaniqwa jarvis

Itanekeya word

eic + creative director

| culture |                                               

                                                  shaniqwa jarvis

tanekeya word [I]: your ability to capture the essence of culture, and the unguarded personalities of your subjects, even in commercial work, creates authentic portraiture; what is it about you, that allows your subjects to open up in front of your lens?
 
shaniqwa jarvis [sj]: i think it’s something different for each of my subjects, but i’m usually myself and find that most people relate positively to that sense of being comfortable in my own skin. i’ve been told that i have a calming effect on people; i believe [it] helps people to open up and be natural in front of the camera, resulting in a authentic representation of themselves.
 
I: what excites you most about photographing kids + the “fleeting nuances” of youth culture?
 
 sj: being a kid at heart makes it quite enjoyable to photograph kids. i find them to be very honest and fun to shoot. it’s a new market; you can do anything, there aren’t many restrictions, which i feel makes it quite exciting to work on kid projects.  
 
 
I: there is a mutual synergy, between photographer and collaborator, when capturing portraiture. popular culture figures, youth, fashion, and lifestyle brands, that are rooted in subculture, are the focus of much of your work; do you self-identify with your collaborators? if so, how?
 
sj: i believe that i identify with most of my collaborators. i am fully immersed in the culture of which i work, contribute and draw inspiration from. i have created a space with my work, where i am encouraged to give my point of view,  which is a rare and special one. i also find that i am a bit lucky in that a lot of the brands i’ve admired, while growing up, i am now working with.
 
 
I: when was the last time you had a blank slate? what did you do with it?
 
sj: the last time i was given a blank slate was when i shot looney tunes x stussy kids. i was sent a box of clothing and allowed to do whatever i wanted. i bounced around a few ideas and then landed on what i felt would work best. i took inspiration from my personal project titled this charming man, and created a concept for the shoot that i knew would allow each kid to bring it on set. it was stussy’s first kids collection shoot; and i wanted the casting and images to be different from what you normally see, but true to the stussy brand. 
  
I: you “triangulate between new york, los angeles and london,” if you were to personify each city as a lover, what type of lover would they be and why?
 
sj: 
new york: stable.
los angeles: sometimey.

london: creative.

_______________________________________________________________

+ shaniqwa jarvis is a new yorker who will put anything in a deep fat fryer.




source:
+ © neonV volume III: bare | MMXIV |neonV, llc  
+ © photos courtesy of shaniqwa jarvis


I: tanekeya word
eic + creative director

| culture |                                               

                                                  shaniqwa jarvis

tanekeya word [I]: your ability to capture the essence of culture, and the unguarded personalities of your subjects, even in commercial work, creates authentic portraiture; what is it about you, that allows your subjects to open up in front of your lens?

 

shaniqwa jarvis [sj]: i think it’s something different for each of my subjects, but i’m usually myself and find that most people relate positively to that sense of being comfortable in my own skin. i’ve been told that i have a calming effect on people; i believe [it] helps people to open up and be natural in front of the camera, resulting in a authentic representation of themselves.

 

I: what excites you most about photographing kids + the “fleeting nuances” of youth culture?

 

 sj: being a kid at heart makes it quite enjoyable to photograph kids. i find them to be very honest and fun to shoot. it’s a new market; you can do anything, there aren’t many restrictions, which i feel makes it quite exciting to work on kid projects.  

 

 

I: there is a mutual synergy, between photographer and collaborator, when capturing portraiture. popular culture figures, youth, fashion, and lifestyle brands, that are rooted in subculture, are the focus of much of your work; do you self-identify with your collaborators? if so, how?

 

sj: i believe that i identify with most of my collaborators. i am fully immersed in the culture of which i work, contribute and draw inspiration from. i have created a space with my work, where i am encouraged to give my point of view,  which is a rare and special one. i also find that i am a bit lucky in that a lot of the brands i’ve admired, while growing up, i am now working with.

 

 

I: when was the last time you had a blank slate? what did you do with it?

 

sj: the last time i was given a blank slate was when i shot looney tunes x stussy kids. i was sent a box of clothing and allowed to do whatever i wanted. i bounced around a few ideas and then landed on what i felt would work best. i took inspiration from my personal project titled this charming man, and created a concept for the shoot that i knew would allow each kid to bring it on set. it was stussy’s first kids collection shoot; and i wanted the casting and images to be different from what you normally see, but true to the stussy brand. 

  

I: you “triangulate between new york, los angeles and london,” if you were to personify each city as a lover, what type of lover would they be and why?

 

sj

new york: stable.

los angeles: sometimey.

london: creative.

_______________________________________________________________

+ shaniqwa jarvis is a new yorker who will put anything in a deep fat fryer.

source:

+ © neonV volume III: bare MMXIV |neonVllc  

+ © photos courtesy of shaniqwa jarvis

Itanekeya word

eic + creative director

| art |

                                            toyin odutola

tanekeya word [I]: if you were to create a zine, what would be the name of the zine, and what would be its mission?
 
 
toyin odutola [to]: all surfaces are approximate. it’s actually a legal phrase involving copyright, i think; but it’s a phrase that has been on my mind lately. i’ve even considered it for a title of a series or, maybe, a portrait. so much of my work deals with perception and surfaces, how surfaces are the frame, navigated by material choices, methodologies, even subject. i think the zine would revolve around that: art that plays with surfaces, formally and conceptually. it wouldn’t be limited to aesthetic solely. 
 
 
 
I: most detail-oriented people have slight obsessive-compulsive disorder tendencies, do you have any? if so, name three.
 
 
to: absolutely. i’m very ritualistic in how i work. i could say, “routine,” but my studio method serves more than a pragmatic function. it also has a way of calming me down; it’s slightly meditative. i always quote the phrase: “drawing is like prayer” — i’m not sure who it is attributed to, either matisse or gerard manley hopkins. i love that idea because it harkens the act of drawing to a spiritual experience, and i feel that. i’m pretty neurotic about a variety of things, such as keeping my pens and other materials in a certain order, and having my papers and works arranged a certain way; however, most of my supposed “obsessive-compulsiveness” is in the act of drawing itself. there are stages i go through with each drawing, no matter how different (and each process does vary depending on the drawing, to be sure), that requires a sort of… orchestration? maybe that is too grand a word, but i always try and do each with precision, not for the sake of the drawing itself, moreso for the sake of my sanity. it calms me. 
 
 
 
I: what will be toyin odutola’s narrative in ten years? 
 
 
to: i honestly have no idea. what i have learned so far is that everything involving artmaking today is very unpredictable. if someone had told me that i would be living in new york five, even three, years ago, i would have thought that was nuts. i’m just trying to keep myself focused and pushing myself creatively for me and not for any other influence or person. it’s important for me to continue expanding, but it’s also important that the narrative of this life be full of happiness, with joy.
 
 
_______________________________________________________________

+ toyin odutola is where process + continuous expansion meet.




read the IV part interview in it’s entirety here…
source:
+ © neonV volume III: bare | MMXIV |neonV, llc  
+ © “when the witnesses are gone” courtesy of jack shainman gallery, nyc


I: tanekeya word
eic + creative director

| art |

                                            toyin odutola

tanekeya word [I]: if you were to create a zine, what would be the name of the zine, and what would be its mission?

 

 

toyin odutola [to]: all surfaces are approximate. it’s actually a legal phrase involving copyright, i think; but it’s a phrase that has been on my mind lately. i’ve even considered it for a title of a series or, maybe, a portrait. so much of my work deals with perception and surfaces, how surfaces are the frame, navigated by material choices, methodologies, even subject. i think the zine would revolve around that: art that plays with surfaces, formally and conceptually. it wouldn’t be limited to aesthetic solely. 

 

 

 

I: most detail-oriented people have slight obsessive-compulsive disorder tendencies, do you have any? if so, name three.

 

 

to: absolutely. i’m very ritualistic in how i work. i could say, “routine,” but my studio method serves more than a pragmatic function. it also has a way of calming me down; it’s slightly meditative. i always quote the phrase: “drawing is like prayer” — i’m not sure who it is attributed to, either matisse or gerard manley hopkins. i love that idea because it harkens the act of drawing to a spiritual experience, and i feel that. i’m pretty neurotic about a variety of things, such as keeping my pens and other materials in a certain order, and having my papers and works arranged a certain way; however, most of my supposed “obsessive-compulsiveness” is in the act of drawing itself. there are stages i go through with each drawing, no matter how different (and each process does vary depending on the drawing, to be sure), that requires a sort of… orchestration? maybe that is too grand a word, but i always try and do each with precision, not for the sake of the drawing itself, moreso for the sake of my sanity. it calms me. 

 

 

 

I: what will be toyin odutola’s narrative in ten years?

 

 

to: i honestly have no idea. what i have learned so far is that everything involving artmaking today is very unpredictable. if someone had told me that i would be living in new york five, even three, years ago, i would have thought that was nuts. i’m just trying to keep myself focused and pushing myself creatively for me and not for any other influence or person. it’s important for me to continue expanding, but it’s also important that the narrative of this life be full of happiness, with joy.

 

 

_______________________________________________________________

+ toyin odutola is where process + continuous expansion meet.

read the IV part interview in it’s entirety here

source:

+ © neonV volume III: bare MMXIV |neonVllc  

+ © “when the witnesses are gone” courtesy of jack shainman gallery, nyc

Itanekeya word

eic + creative director

| art |

                                           toyin odutola

tanekeya word [I]: fill in the blank:honesty is to _______________ as portraiture is to ______________ .
 
 
toyin odutola [to]: i should preface that i’m really bad at this sort of thing. here’s a go: “honesty is to love as portraiture is to art?” 
 
 
 
I: creating is an intimate act for the artist who works alone in their studio, so if you could collaborate with anyone from the past or present, who would it be and why, what project would you all work on together?
 
to: it’s funny you should mention this, because for the past few months i have been considering collaboration for the first time. right now, i am planning to work on a comic book project with a  friend of mine. it’s really exciting trading emails, writing the script and forging this new story together. it’s very different from what i’m used to, but it’s refreshing to have another person in the incubator with you, treading through the marshes together, to, hopefully, arrive at something we are both happy with and proud of. 
 
 
 
I: self portraiture is the original selfie. over the years, what have you discovered about yourself, by drawing yourself?
 

to: it’s so weird. i must be one of the few people who takes a selfie for reference and not simply for the sake of it alone. ha! i’m interested in using my image as a navigator for a story. i’m not so concerned about my image being misinterpreted, because that is almost inevitable, it’s all filters, as aforementioned. what i am interested in when working with my image is the idea of where that image can go. it’s boring limiting the self portrait to what i am in this reality, that needs no embellishment or enhancement. the reference should be the starting point into something else, something expansive. what i learn from each portrait is what and how a face, a body, an image can become, say, a landscape, a poem, a letter, a symposium, a musical composition… . all of these things and more are possible.  

keep up with the IV part interview here…

source:
+ © neonV volume III: bare | MMXIV |neonV, llc  
+ © “the paradox of education” courtesy of jack shainman gallery, nyc


I: tanekeya word
eic + creative director

| art |

                                           toyin odutola

tanekeya word [I]: fill in the blank:honesty is to _______________ as portraiture is to ______________ .

 

 

toyin odutola [to]: i should preface that i’m really bad at this sort of thing. here’s a go: “honesty is to love as portraiture is to art?”

 

 

 

I: creating is an intimate act for the artist who works alone in their studio, so if you could collaborate with anyone from the past or present, who would it be and why, what project would you all work on together?

 

to: it’s funny you should mention this, because for the past few months i have been considering collaboration for the first time. right now, i am planning to work on a comic book project with a  friend of mine. it’s really exciting trading emails, writing the script and forging this new story together. it’s very different from what i’m used to, but it’s refreshing to have another person in the incubator with you, treading through the marshes together, to, hopefully, arrive at something we are both happy with and proud of. 

 

 

 

I: self portraiture is the original selfie. over the years, what have you discovered about yourself, by drawing yourself?

 

to: it’s so weird. i must be one of the few people who takes a selfie for reference and not simply for the sake of it alone. ha! i’m interested in using my image as a navigator for a story. i’m not so concerned about my image being misinterpreted, because that is almost inevitable, it’s all filters, as aforementioned. what i am interested in when working with my image is the idea of where that image can go. it’s boring limiting the self portrait to what i am in this reality, that needs no embellishment or enhancement. the reference should be the starting point into something else, something expansive. what i learn from each portrait is what and how a face, a body, an image can become, say, a landscape, a poem, a letter, a symposium, a musical composition… . all of these things and more are possible.  

keep up with the IV part interview here

source:

+ © neonV volume III: bare MMXIV |neonVllc  

+ © “the paradox of education” courtesy of jack shainman gallery, nyc

Itanekeya word

eic + creative director

| art |
                                             toyin odutola

tanekeya word [I]: it is oft stated, “to be vulnerable is to be naked,” when are you the most naked?
 
toyin odutola [to]: hmmm… i try to avoid that. ha! i’m vulnerable enough when i’m working, especially in the very beginning stages of a drawing. yeah… that’s when i am most vulnerable. everything outside the studio and the act of drawing is simply… avoided. 
 
 
 
I: although your work is seemingly assertive, you have a passion for comics, and laughter. how does the binaries of assertiveness/playfulness collaborate in your work?  
 
 
to:  i think i need that balance. because of the intensity of my drawing process, i often crave outlets and inspirations such as those found in comics and humor. i grew up in a house full of laughter and much passion. nigerian households are very boisterous spaces, full of storytelling. i suppose it was only inexorable for me to gravitate towards activities and books that revolve around that. i have a propensity towards invention, binaries… i find it comforting when these inextricable aspects of life are exposed. it reminds me that failure is always imminent and that conquering one’s insecurities in this regard are a personal triumph. furthermore, laughter is a kind of medicine in a way, it really is. 
 
 
 
I: what are you actively delving into this spring/summer? 
 
to: charcoal and pastel drawing on a larger scale. i’m trying this new thing: tackling activities and works that terrify me. so far, i’m getting more and more terrified. but what i am learning from the process so far is immeasurable.

keep up with the IV part interview here…

source:
+ © neonV volume III: bare | MMXIV |neonV, llc  
+ © “rather than look back, she chose to look at you” courtesy of jack shainman gallery, nyc
 

I: tanekeya word
eic + creative director

| art |

                                             toyin odutola

tanekeya word [I]: it is oft stated, “to be vulnerable is to be naked,” when are you the most naked?

 

toyin odutola [to]: hmmm… i try to avoid that. ha! i’m vulnerable enough when i’m working, especially in the very beginning stages of a drawing. yeah… that’s when i am most vulnerable. everything outside the studio and the act of drawing is simply… avoided. 

 

 

 

I: although your work is seemingly assertive, you have a passion for comics, and laughter. how does the binaries of assertiveness/playfulness collaborate in your work?  

 

 

to:  i think i need that balance. because of the intensity of my drawing process, i often crave outlets and inspirations such as those found in comics and humor. i grew up in a house full of laughter and much passion. nigerian households are very boisterous spaces, full of storytelling. i suppose it was only inexorable for me to gravitate towards activities and books that revolve around that. i have a propensity towards invention, binaries… i find it comforting when these inextricable aspects of life are exposed. it reminds me that failure is always imminent and that conquering one’s insecurities in this regard are a personal triumph. furthermore, laughter is a kind of medicine in a way, it really is. 

 

 

 

I: what are you actively delving into this spring/summer?

 

to: charcoal and pastel drawing on a larger scale. i’m trying this new thing: tackling activities and works that terrify me. so far, i’m getting more and more terrified. but what i am learning from the process so far is immeasurable.

keep up with the IV part interview here

source:

+ © neonV volume III: bare MMXIV |neonVllc  

+ © “rather than look back, she chose to look at you” courtesy of jack shainman gallery, nyc

 

Itanekeya word

eic + creative director

| art |

                                              toyin odutola
 
there isn’t much people do alone anymore, simple acts are photographed, collaged, posted, commented on + sent into the cloud on a daily. we are all documentarians + archivists seeking to explore our journeys + the fleeting moments that trigger our emotions for better or for worse. toyinodutola is no stranger to this contemporary cultural performance, she greets the process with great respect as she understands the magic in reciprocity. odutola sees the act of documenting self, as a creative process of collaboration. 
 
 
tanekeya word [I]: as agents of process, you are known to document your artistic process via instagram, @obia_thethird, while james baldwin advocated for the creative process, in his 1962 book. baldwin bequeathed creatives with these words of wisdom: “the artist cannot and must not take anything for granted, but must drive to the heart of every answer and expose the question the answer hides.”
 
as an artist, what questions are you exposing via documenting your studio process, that were often hidden in the art industry’s answers to becoming a successful artist? 
 
what is one thing that you do not take for granted?
 
toyin odutola [to]: 
 
that’s a really great question. i love that quote by baldwin. love it so much, i got it tattooed on my right arm, my art making arm. ha! i relate to that quote because it drives at the heart of what artmaking, regardless of field, is all about: perception. sure, one could look at it from a very romantic notion, that of culture creation and production; but it’s more than that. art is meant to highlight and bring attention to social, political, economic, sexual, religious, and ethical, questions. filters that we often deem are tacit knowledge, but are really invention. every tradition, every standard, convention and rule, we have been socialized into believing are universal truths were once invented by a person or a group of people. art often reminds us of this, because it is the basis of what it is, it’s very foundation. 
 

other professions may feel more dogmatic in this sense, but it’s all the same, the only difference in this regard, between…say, a painter, a politician, a space engineer, a priest, a chemist, a writer, and an architect, is perception: what we each think of these different professions/vocations in any given context. with art the context doesn’t matter, the vacuum is always present. the reason i am so interested in exposing the process of making is because i want people to understand how mercurial the act of making is. it’s nothing glamorous. it’s a solitary act. it involves many doubts and quandaries. in the end, the act of making is… more meaningful, more precious, in many cases, than the eventual product of the making. there’s a narrative beneath the official narrative. the layers pile on and you are often left with the final execution. i want to unveil that; to show the richness and depth that is often hidden when you approach a piece in a gallery or museum. that is what i fell in love with when i first came upon art and later decided to get involved with artmaking when i was younger. the process is everything. i want to share this beautiful experience. to be truthful, the primary audience i am thinking of when i share my process on instagram and/or my tumblr blog is me. to remind myself what this is really about. the glamorous aspect of this life, the gifts and joys it brings are incredible yet fleeting; the reality is very stark, and that’s ok. 

keep up with the IV part interview here…

source:
+ © neonV volume III: bare | MMXIV |neonV, llc  
+ © “hold it in your mouth a little longer” courtesy of jack shainman gallery, nyc

I: tanekeya word
eic + creative director

| art |

                                              toyin odutola

 

there isn’t much people do alone anymore, simple acts are photographed, collaged, posted, commented on + sent into the cloud on a daily. we are all documentarians + archivists seeking to explore our journeys + the fleeting moments that trigger our emotions for better or for worse. toyinodutola is no stranger to this contemporary cultural performance, she greets the process with great respect as she understands the magic in reciprocity. odutola sees the act of documenting self, as a creative process of collaboration.

 

 

tanekeya word [I]: as agents of process, you are known to document your artistic process via instagram, @obia_thethird, while james baldwin advocated for the creative process, in his 1962 book. baldwin bequeathed creatives with these words of wisdom: “the artist cannot and must not take anything for granted, but must drive to the heart of every answer and expose the question the answer hides.”

 

as an artist, what questions are you exposing via documenting your studio process, that were often hidden in the art industry’s answers to becoming a successful artist?

 

what is one thing that you do not take for granted?

 

toyin odutola [to]:

 

that’s a really great question. i love that quote by baldwin. love it so much, i got it tattooed on my right arm, my art making arm. ha! i relate to that quote because it drives at the heart of what artmaking, regardless of field, is all about: perception. sure, one could look at it from a very romantic notion, that of culture creation and production; but it’s more than that. art is meant to highlight and bring attention to social, political, economic, sexual, religious, and ethical, questions. filters that we often deem are tacit knowledge, but are really invention. every tradition, every standard, convention and rule, we have been socialized into believing are universal truths were once invented by a person or a group of people. art often reminds us of this, because it is the basis of what it is, it’s very foundation.

 

other professions may feel more dogmatic in this sense, but it’s all the same, the only difference in this regard, between…say, a painter, a politician, a space engineer, a priest, a chemist, a writer, and an architect, is perception: what we each think of these different professions/vocations in any given context. with art the context doesn’t matter, the vacuum is always present. the reason i am so interested in exposing the process of making is because i want people to understand how mercurial the act of making is. it’s nothing glamorous. it’s a solitary act. it involves many doubts and quandaries. in the end, the act of making is… more meaningful, more precious, in many cases, than the eventual product of the making. there’s a narrative beneath the official narrative. the layers pile on and you are often left with the final execution. i want to unveil that; to show the richness and depth that is often hidden when you approach a piece in a gallery or museum. that is what i fell in love with when i first came upon art and later decided to get involved with artmaking when i was younger. the process is everything. i want to share this beautiful experience. to be truthful, the primary audience i am thinking of when i share my process on instagram and/or my tumblr blog is me. to remind myself what this is really about. the glamorous aspect of this life, the gifts and joys it brings are incredible yet fleeting; the reality is very stark, and that’s ok

keep up with the IV part interview here

source:

+ © neonV volume III: bare MMXIV |neonVllc  

+ © “hold it in your mouth a little longer” courtesy of jack shainman gallery, nyc

Itanekeya word

eic + creative director

| beauty |
                                         in the midst of #darkness

                                              “dear diary”                                     
in a world full of selfies, who are we really? social media stands as a platform for you to be whomever you want, but does that really just exploit our vulnerability?

+ credits
photographer: aki akiwumi 

project manager: karmin battle

models: brittany athey

hair: charlay jones 

makeup artists: anthony kinard, sandra ayala 

studio: the move studio 
2408 t street ne 
washington, dc 20002 

source:
+ © neonV volume III: bare |MMXIV |neonV, llc                                           
IV: michelle german
health + beauty director

| beauty |

                                         in the midst of #darkness

                                              “dear diary”                                     

in a world full of selfies, who are we really? social media stands as a platform for you to be whomever you want, but does that really just exploit our vulnerability?

+ credits


photographer: aki akiwumi 

project manager: karmin battle

models: brittany athey

hair: charlay jones 

makeup artists: anthony kinardsandra ayala 

studio: the move studio 

2408 t street ne 

washingtondc 20002 

source:

+ © neonV volume III: bare |MMXIV |neonVllc                                           

IV: michelle german

health + beauty director